“We have to change the negative things into positive…

Director of Audition and Itchi the Killer
Director of Audition and Itchi the Killer

The following is a quote from the talented Movie Director, Takashi Miike , and as I read it, I can’t stop thinking that the sentiment applies to how I feel about F.E and Level 1 programmes.

So here is the quote:

“We have to change the negative things into positive. In today’s Japanese film industry we always say we don’t have enough budget, that people don’t go to see the films. But we can think of it in a positive way, meaning that if audiences don’t go to the cinema we can make any movie we want. After all, no matter what kind of movie you make it’s never a hit, so we can make a really bold, daring movie. There are many talented actors and crew, but many Japanese movies aren’t interesting. Many films are made with the image of what a Japanese film should be like. Some films venture outside those expectations a little bit, but I feel we should break them.”

And here is my bastardisation/ adaption:

“We have to change the negative things into positive. In today’s Educational environment we always say we don’t have enough budget, that there isn’t enough support for what you do in class. We can think of it in a positive way, meaning that with the freedom offered with Programmes of Study we can have any class we want. After all no matter what you do it’s unlikely to gain public acclaim, so you can make a really bold, daring Scheme of Work. There are many talented students and teachers, but many classes aren’t interesting. Many lessons are planned with an idea of what a lesson should be like. Some PoS venture outside those expectations a little but, but I feel we should break them.”

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Cultural Relevance

The Times Educational Supplement produces Podcasts, one of them specialises on Further Education and its Producer is the sublime Sarah Simons who also marshals UKFeChat

Presumably when others didn’t answer the phone, I got called and interviewed for the podcast.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/tes-further-education-podcast/id672401390?i=168897461&mt=2

Modified RePost: Doing What You Love

extremely hard 002-thumb

Things have not gone to plan.

The good news is I accidentally have a career. The bad news is that whilst I have done a lot of reading, researching and planning, I have done little with it.

Time to stop allowing Life to be an excuse for not creating, because I have been consuming in vast amounts.

Being a lecturer I am on holiday and have used that time to achieve very little.

Time for that to change.

Got lots on, of course, exciting changes at college, ideas I need to pluck out of my head and show to the world.

Mantra: I Must Work Extremely Hard Doing What I Love…

344 Questions pt3: What are your expectations

In broad strokes how do you think your life will turn out?
I’m an optimistic person, generally, and with the information I have to hand, I think, and I hope, that it will turn out well, successful, relative to my own needs and desires. Within the system that we live, finances are a consistent form of tension in the back of my mind. I didn’t pick a career, well I didn’t it found me, but it isn’t one for somebody who wants financial riches. (what I really need is a one off payment of say 20k, tax free (see I don’t even aspire to Euromillions) but not playing the lotto, I am not in it to win it)
By developing my experiences, knowledge and expertise I am hopeful for a full, fulfilling and rearding (are they three things that mean the same thing?) career, one that may actually do a lot of good. I hope that my personal life will stay happy, stable and healthy. I hope I continue to read, to learn, (to blog!) to share, to bridge and close gaps.
Aspiring to die an old man, remembered fondly and well, by people, even if they can’t quite remember why.

Name five things that you think will happen to you this year
Approx a third of the way through the year and on a personal level this have changed fairly dramatically, I moved in with my partner… and her two children, and we recently got a dog! On a Teaching level, we are into the first year of Programmes of Study and still working out what that means. On a Learner level I am days away from starting my M.A in Advanced Educational Practice at the Institute of Education.

If I had answered this question when intended (ha!) then they would have been three answers for sure.

Answering it now what does 2014, still hold, from a Teacher/Learner focus.

1) A new academic year, running 1 year courses that means new students and challenges.
2) Submission of two proposals at work, that I’m not ready to talk about here yet. But. If it gets the go ahead, then will mean changes, exciting changes.
3) Coaching, I recently did a coaching course run by Kevin Cherry and whilst I still have a lot more to learn, I plan to be regularly coaching.
4) Development of my specialisms, a hybrid of Behaviour Management, Level 1 PoS and Film in Education/ Cultural literacy. Thing.
5) I won’t take a summer holiday.

Do you consider yourself Lucky? Charmed? Average? Born to greatness?
Why? Do you have any evidence?

From a Teacher/Learner perspective, I’m being tentative about what I write so as not to appear smug, self satisfied, arrogant. It is an issue, in my humble opinion, that not enough time and focus is given on reflection , reflective practice and evidence based learning.
Part of that is a difficulty looking at ourselves without appearing weak, failures, unsuitable for teaching, for leading. Admitting frailty is difficult. Which makes learning from it harder.

I don’t think that I was born to greatness, but I aspire to it. Within my chosen/ developed field within F.E I would like to develop my voice, my understanding, my opportunities. I think I am an above average Teacher/ Learner, but that is said without any real understanding of what average means in this context. I am to study an M.A, where does that put me in the bell curve? My lesson observations go largely well. I have predominately good relations, with Managers, Peers, Students and Parents.

I am lucky, but I acknowledge that part of that is making your own luck. I have always been good at reading information that would be useful, I can never quite work out if that is because I force it into being relevant to the conversation. I am lucky in that I got to University, on the third try, and it enabled me to meet people and put me in the position to experience things without which I never would have had the chance to start in F.E. I also recognise that I had the good grace and the good sense to recognise the opportunities when they appeared, and went for them.
I am lucky in that life made me somebody largely likeable enough, that people forgive and people laugh. And that gets you through.

How can you push yourself further?
By setting myself objectives and targets. By telling other’s of them and not shirking.
By focusing on my studies and achieving high standards.
By focusing on my teaching and enabling others to achieve.
To be honest about my weaknesses and to demonstrate my strengths.
By not trying to do too much, but not excusing doing too little.

In an example of learning something relevant, or learning something and making (forcing it to be relevant) today I watched the following TED talk.

Which it is I’ll let you decide.

Before you Teach, Learn…

To enjoy, achieve and succeed.

To innovate and challenge.

I need you to help me not become bored and alone..

You are part of my Wyrd as I work on my Gravity.

I love what I do, and I want to help you love what you do, becuase that will help me to continue to love what I do.

 

 

‘Ernest Hemingway once wrote “The internet is a fine place… and worth fighting for.” I agree with the second part…’

This is a deliberate misqoute from the film Seven, and I used it on and old blog for things I wanted to share with you things that I never would have seen, and sometimes would not exist without the internet.

Today I (Re)present A Softer World, a series of photo strips, often heartbreaking and funny at the same time.

And this is probably my favourite, click the image to make bigger.

By E Horne and J Comeau